Tag Archives: history

Centres of Worlds: On International Law and Maps

Maps in the 21st Century, such as this screen capture of Google maps, are readily available for anyone with an internet connection. To uses a variety of different data sets to bring together a functional map. It uses satellite data, shows seabed formations, gives traffic information whilst giving directions, has peer-sourced images and street-view. Simply astounding how all this information has been democratized.

Maps in the 21st Century, such as this screen capture of Google maps, are readily available for anyone with an internet connection. It uses a variety of different data sets to bring together a functional map. It uses satellite data, shows seabed formations, gives traffic information whilst giving directions, has peer-sourced images and street-view. Simply astounding how all this information has been democratized.

Recently, I had the intention to engage with a call for papers entitled “International Law’s Objects: Emergence, Encounter and Erasure through Object and Image”. Unfortunately, in light of doctoral writing and other publication timelines, it became clear that it was unlikely that I could give the proposed contribution the attention it required. So, rather regretfully, I decided to give the call a miss.

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Reflections From Beijing

My recent visit to Beijing brought to mind a number of themes relating to international legal theory/history. Themes that I’ve not, at least since I’d started my doctoral project, had the opportunity to read and reflect upon. Themes such as Cháogòng tǐzhì (‘Tribute system’) and Sinocentrism. These themes are arguably defunct as appropriate descriptions of international order or international ideology these days, but, I think those themes continue to serve as useful prisms through which to understand some aspects of contemporary Chinese diplomacy.

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CFP: After Empire: The League of Nations and the former Habsburg Lands

Originally seen on ESIL’s interest group on the History of International Law blog (http://esilhil.blogspot.com/)

Call for Papers:

CFP: After Empire: The League of Nations and the former Habsburg Lands (Vienna, 11-12 December 2015); DEADLINE: 31 January 2015

The call for papers for this workshop is now open. If you would like to apply please submit a paper abstract of around 200 words by the end of January 2015 to peter.becker@univie.ac.at or ngw2103@columbia.edu.

If the Austro-Hungarian empire gave way to a new order of nation-states at the end of the First World War, the birth of that order coincided with a broader new international settlement with the League of Nations at its heart. Continue reading

FutureLearn – Free Online Course – World War 1: Paris 1919 – A New World Order?

FutureLearn is offering a course designed in partnership with the BBC to commemorate World War I. Professor Tams leads the course which reassesses the aspirations for a new world order by those participating in the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. Christian J. Tams is Professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow. The course begins 13 October 2014.

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The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 not only ended the Great War, but also redrew the map of the world. By doing so, the events leading to the conference and its treaties ushered in a new era of international relations. Often criticised as naive, the peace-makers in Paris set up the precursor to the United Nations, a ‘world organisation’ called the League of Nations.

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