Tag Archives: global history

An Introduction: Hague Conventions 1899 and 1907

JamesBrownScott

The following passages is a transcription; of an introduction written in 1915 for an edited collection that placed the Hague Conventions and Declarations of 1899 and 1907 in context. Albeit, ‘for the time’ it ought to be noted. Those interested in international legal and diplomatic history would find some use, I hope, in these passages. The writer of these passages is James Brown Scott (pictured above), who at the time was Director of the Division of International Law at The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Scott was an influential figure, in the American contribution to international law during the early half of the 20th century. (NB: Citations in the original text have not been transcribed.)

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Centres of Worlds: On International Law and Maps

Maps in the 21st Century, such as this screen capture of Google maps, are readily available for anyone with an internet connection. To uses a variety of different data sets to bring together a functional map. It uses satellite data, shows seabed formations, gives traffic information whilst giving directions, has peer-sourced images and street-view. Simply astounding how all this information has been democratized.

Maps in the 21st Century, such as this screen capture of Google maps, are readily available for anyone with an internet connection. It uses a variety of different data sets to bring together a functional map. It uses satellite data, shows seabed formations, gives traffic information whilst giving directions, has peer-sourced images and street-view. Simply astounding how all this information has been democratized.

Recently, I had the intention to engage with a call for papers entitled “International Law’s Objects: Emergence, Encounter and Erasure through Object and Image”. Unfortunately, in light of doctoral writing and other publication timelines, it became clear that it was unlikely that I could give the proposed contribution the attention it required. So, rather regretfully, I decided to give the call a miss.

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